Citizens Guide to the Inland Wetlands and Watercourses Commission

Introduction

 

This guide was created to help citizens better understand the inland wetlands process so that they may participate more effectively and have a more active and positive role in protecting wetlands and watercourses.  The Planning Department has provided the information contained in this guide for educational purposes and it is not intended as legal advice.  As statutes, regulations, and ordinances are subject to change, please consult with the Planning Department for the most up to date information.

Using this Guide

 

To navigate through the pages of this guide, please use the links below.  These page links will be located at the bottom of each page in the guide.  You will note blue hypertext throughout this guide.  These will either open a new tab, a new window or take you directly to other web pages and documents, where you can get more information.  To return to this guide from outside documents or pages, close any new tabs or windows or hit your back button.  Many documents are in Adobe PDF format, which requires Adobe's free Acrobat Reader that you can download here.

Table of Contents

Main Page

IWWC Meetings Explained

Planning Department

Inland Wetlands and Watercourses Commission

General Procedures

Did You Know?

Not all driveway sealing products are created equal.  These products often come in two basic formulations, with either asphalt or coal tar as their main ingredients.  While neither product is free of toxic materials, a USGS study has shown that dust from surfaces coated with coal tar-based sealants contain hundreds to one-thousand times the concentration of a class of toxic chemicals known as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) than dust from surfaces treated with asphalt-based products.  Coal tar-based sealants were also the largest source of PAH contamination in 40 lakes studied by the USGS, acounting for more than half of the measured PAH pollution.

 

PAHs are a known carcinogen and a common byproduct of almost any combustion.  PAHs can be found at levels ranging from low levels in ordinary burning candles and charred meats to highly toxic levels in coal ash/tar.  Coal tar-based sealants have purportedly left PAHs on driveways at levels that would require a hazardous materials handling suit to remove them in the event of a toxic-waste cleanup of a site.

 

If your driveway is cracked and in need of sealing, please choose an asphalt-based sealing product if you are doing it yourself, or choose a professional who will use asphalt-based sealants for you.  If your driveway is structuraly fine and you just want to freshen its appearance with a fresh black coat, think twice about adding unnecessary and potentially toxic chemicals to your property.