Pending Applications

Current Applications

ApplicantStatusDetails
Special Use - 276 Palisado Avenue, In-Law Apartment, Groenstein/Forward Solutions
PendingView Details
Text Amendment – Zoning Regulations Sections 4.1, 4.2 and 14.2, Town of Windsor
PendingView Details
Special Use Re-approval – 1001 Day Hill Road, Temporary School Bus Yard, 1001 Day Hill Road, LLC/DATTCO, Inc.
ApprovedView Details
Text Amendment – Zoning Regulations Section 16.1.11, Bonding Requirements, Great Pond Village/Great Pond Improvement District/Pullman & Comely, LLC
ApprovedView Details
Special Use - Transfer of Non-Residential Coverage, 880 Marshall Phelps Road to 80 Lamberton Road, Hawthorne MBM III, LLC/80 Lamberton Road Realty Co., LLC/Alford
ApprovedView Details

Planning Department staff serve as liaisons to various commissions including the Town Planning & Zoning Commission, the Inland Wetland & Watercourses Commission, and the Historic District Commission.  Applications pending before these various commissions can be found above.  If you have questions or comments, or would like additional information about one of the applications below, please contact the appropriate commission liasion who will be happy to provide you with assistance.

 

Town Planning & Zoning Commission

 

The applications listed as "pending" will be heard at the next regular meeting of the Town Planning & Zoning Commission.  Details regarding this commission's schedule, agenda, actions, and minutes can be found here.  Questions or comments regarding applications can be forwarded to Marian Madison, Planning Secretary at (860) 285-1980 or madison@townofwindsorct.com.  Recently approved applications will appear as "approved" on the list above.  For information on how you can participate in the planning process, please visit the Citizens Guide to the Town Planning and Zoning Commission

 

Inland Wetlands & Watercourses Commission

 

The applications listed as "pending" will be heard at the next regular meeting of the Inland Wetland & Watercourses Commission. Details regarding this commission's schedule, agenda, actions, and minutes can be found here.  Questions or comments regarding these applications can be forwarded to Tom Hazel, Wetlands Agent, at (860) 285-1987 or hazel@townofwindsorct.com.  Recently approved applications will appear as "approved" on the list above.  Applications that the Commission has recently delegated to the Wetlands Agent will appear as "Delegated to Agent".

 

Historic District Commission

 

The Historic District Commission meets as applications for Certificates of Appropriateness are submitted.  The applications listed as "pending" will be heard at the next meeting of the Historic District Commission.  Details regarding this commission's schedule, agenda, actions, and minutes can be found here.  Questions or comments can be forwarded to Abby St. Peter, Assistant Town Planner, at (860) 285-1982 or stpeter@townofwindsorct.com.  Applications listed as "Approved" have recently been granted a Certificate of Appropriateness by the Commission.

 

Did You Know?

If you are building a new home or need to replace your furnace, air conditioner and/or water heater, a ground-source heat pump can be a cost-effective alternative to new or replacement heating and cooling systems. 

 

Taking advantage of the relatively constant temperatures of the ground below the frost line, a ground-source heat pump costs 30 to 70 percent less to operate for heating and 20 to 50 percent less for cooling over conventional furnaces, air-source heat pumps, and air conditioners.  You can also take advantage of free hot water in the summer when operating in cooling mode by using heat collected from the air in your home to heat your hot water rather than send the heat back into the ground to be dissipated. 

 

Ground-source heat pumps cost more to install than conventional heating and cooling systems, mainly because of the well drilling or direct burial of outdoor water lines, but depending on how inefficient your current system(s) are, the units can pay for themselves in four to twelve years, and even quicker if energy prices skyrocket in the future.