Historic District Commission

Who We Are

 

The Windsor Historic District Commission (HDC) is an appointed commission charged with the preservation of the historic character of the Windsor Historic District, which is generally located 250 feet to either side of Palisado Avenue, between the Farmington River and Bissell's Ferry Road.  Through its regulations, the HDC regulates the exterior appearance of all man-made structures visible from the street within the Windsor Historic District.

 

Commission Information

 

Members:               Current Membership

 

Address:                 Windsor Historic District Commission

                              c/o Planning Department

                              275 Broad Street

                              Windsor, CT 06095

 

Location                  Town Hall, Second Floor

 

General Phone:       (860) 285-1982

Fax Phone:             (860) 285-1809

General e-mail        planning@townofwindsorct.com 

 

Commission Staff

 

Abby St. Peter Kenyon, AICP

Assistant Town Planner

stpeter@townofwindsorct.com

(860) 285-1982

 

 

 

Meeting Documents

 

Agendas

Actions

Minutes

Applications

 

 

Ordinances and Regulations

 

Historic District Handbook

 

Historic District Establishing Ordinance

 

 

Maps

 

Historic District Map

 

 

Application Form

 

Application

 

 

 

Did You Know?

If you are building a new home or need to replace your furnace, air conditioner and/or water heater, a ground-source heat pump can be a cost-effective alternative to new or replacement heating and cooling systems. 

 

Taking advantage of the relatively constant temperatures of the ground below the frost line, a ground-source heat pump costs 30 to 70 percent less to operate for heating and 20 to 50 percent less for cooling over conventional furnaces, air-source heat pumps, and air conditioners.  You can also take advantage of free hot water in the summer when operating in cooling mode by using heat collected from the air in your home to heat your hot water rather than send the heat back into the ground to be dissipated. 

 

Ground-source heat pumps cost more to install than conventional heating and cooling systems, mainly because of the well drilling or direct burial of outdoor water lines, but depending on how inefficient your current system(s) are, the units can pay for themselves in four to twelve years, and even quicker if energy prices skyrocket in the future.